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The Fleet

The Fleet


Proud to be in Medway

Your preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the pageAs part of our commitment to establishing a school that celebrates Medway’s rich naval heritage, our houses are named after famous ships that were built in Frindsbury, close to where our school is located.

Frindsbury was a centre of ship building before 1820, building at least six 74-gun third rate, ships of the line and many smaller vessels. From 1820, until recent times, the ship yards built over 100 Thames sailing barges. Shipbuilding has stopped but in 2006, one yard was still active in ship repair.

Students at Maritime Academy are divided into six Houses named after historic ships. These Houses provide opportunities for students to compete in House competitions throughout the year. Students can earn points for their House, and the winning House is rewarded each term.

Each form within the Academy will hold the name of one of these prestigious ships. Students will be presented with a pin badge to wear on the left lapel of their blazer to showcase their house with pride.  

The forms will be united as a fleet, building strong relationships and camaraderie with their peers and form tutor. There will be many opportunities for house competitions and, as the school grows, to work with students from the same house within different year groups to learn from each other united as team to showcase excellence as a habit. 

Please note all students are expected to wear the badge that has been gifted to them when they start at the Academy. Should students lose or misplace their badge, they will be expected to purchase a new one from the school office.  

Our Fleet:


Your preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the page HMS Cordelia was a Cherokee-class brig-sloop completed in 1808. She served in home waters during the Napoleonic War, and subsequently in the Mediterranean and the West Indies.

The most famous of any Cherokee-class passenger was naturalist Charles Darwin. HMS Cordelia therefore emboldens the strength in self, particularly in the face of adversity, that we wish to inspire from our students: in the same way Charles Darwin had the strength to overcome the conventional thinking of his time in his pursuit of knowledge- culminating with his magnum opus The Theory of Evolution

Your preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the page HMS Euphrates was a 36-gun fifth rate built as HMS Greyhound, but renamed in 1812 and launched in 1813. This ship was named after the river of the same name which is also the longest in Western Asia.

HMS Euphrates represents the unity we expect from students; to show compassion and respect for another in their shared bond as a Maritime Student in the same way river Euphrates united lands from Turkey to as far as the Middle East.

Your preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the page HMS Mulgrave was a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 1 January 1812 at Upnor.

Third Rate ships represented the pinnacle of shipbuilding in the late 18th Century and HMS Mulgrave embodies the depth of skills and qualities our students will learn. HMS Mulgrave excelled in a variety of fields – from speed and handling, to capability and cost- and we expect Maritime Students to uphold this through a commitment to being the best they can be as a person and as a learner.

Your preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the page HMS Pioneer was a schooner of the Royal Navy, launched in 1810 as a cutter. During her service with the Navy she captured one French privateer and assisted at the capture of another.

From HMS Pioneer, Maritime students will learn to be proud of who they are and use this pride as a source of strength to continually move forward into uncharted waters and face challenge and the unknown with resilience and perseverance.

Your preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the page HMS Reynard  was a 10-gun Cherokee-class brig-sloop launched in 1808 and sold for breaking up in 1818.

The Reynard name bears the intrinsic value in tradition; the first ship in its name was 1780 and the last 1909. It is testament to the pride and strength Reynard instilled that it should be passed down for so long and just as these values held were in her name for over a hundred years – our students will take with them the Maritime Academy values for the rest of their lives.

Your preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the page HMS Shannon was a 38-gun Leda-class frigate of the Royal Navy. She was launched in 1806 and served in the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812.

HMS Shannon quickly grew an esteemed reputation for the excellence of her crew and drew national praise during her escapades in America in 1813. Maritime Academy will make excellence a habit and the capabilities of HMS Shannon is an apt reminder, and source of inspiration, for students that excellence can be a habit with determination and the right work ethic.